Mission Motors: Innovation, Imagination, Zero Emissions – And One Screaming Fast (Electric) Motorcycle

| Friday February 6th, 2009 | 2 Comments

It’s the stuff of entrepreneurial start-up legend – Apple, Google, HP – one or two (or three) very smart, talented, and imaginative people start a fledgling company in a garage with little more than an idea and the vision of how it could change the world.

The founders of Mission Motors – Forrest Deuth, Edward West, and Mason Cabot – haven’t created the next computing breakthrough or internet sensation, but what they have done is taken an idea, combined it with a mission to help make a better, more sustainable world through innovative design and progressive engineering, and stuck with it until their dream became a reality. They’ve done it by designing and building the Mission One – the fastest production electric motorcycle in the world.

Really? All that with a motorcycle? A logical and reasonable question. The founders of Mission Motors believe that “riding a Mission Motorcycle is making statement”. A statement of performance and technology, yes. But one of sustainability as well.

What started as dream, combined with some entrepreneurial savvy (initially pursued in the obligatory garage), came to full fruition last Wednesday when the Mission One was unveiled at the TED conference in Long Beach, California.

There’s been plenty of reporting done in the past couple days on the “gee-whiz” aspects of the bike, I’d like to focus a little more on Mission Motors itself.

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Corporations Buy More Green Power as Debate on Capitol Hill Shapes Up

| Friday February 6th, 2009 | 0 Comments

greenelogo.gif Purchases by some of the nation’s largest corporations, as well as governments and agencies, led to a record total of voluntary “green” power purchases in 2008, according to a ClimateBiz report.
Intel and PepsiCo topped the list of buyers for Green-e Energy Certified renewable power, the Center for Resource Solutions announced late last month. A non-profit agency, the Center provides third-party certifications for the renewable power market.
The rankings were released a few days prior to California Senator Barbara Boxer predicting that Congress would draft legislation to put a national emissions cap-and-trade system in place prior to the December UN international climate change negotiations in Copenhagen, which aim to produce a successor to the Kyoto Protocol.

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From Transactional to Transformational: A Cause Marketing Approach Designed to Change the World

| Friday February 6th, 2009 | 0 Comments

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multicultural%20world_cause%20mktg.jpgBy and large, a cause marketing initiative works best when a company is deeply committed to a particular social issue, and incorporates a greater platform for change than merely transactional efforts. While it has value to tie the proceeds from sales to a particular cause, it has the potential to confuse the landscape if it is not a) made abundantly clear the percentage of the transaction that will be going toward charitable efforts and b) part of a larger, multi-faceted program for affecting change across business functions. (Translation: not only marketing.)
If a consumer pays five dollars for a cup of (RED)coffee at Starbucks, do they feel as though they have contributed that entire amount directly to the cause? Does that, then, give them a sense of doing good without making any additional efforts to help? Would it have been more beneficial for that customer to have given $5 directly to Project RED and forgo the coffee?
These questions bring up the core issues around cause marketing as a campaign [to drive sales/create the perception of social consciousness] vs. an outreach [to drive change/build upon an authentic mission of social consciousness]. It also highlights the importance of transparency around the impact of campaign dollars used and the need for clear communication with consumers so that they can make the most educated choice about their charitable contributions. In some cases, the purchase of a cause-branded item may be better spent as a direct donation with 100% of the contributiion benefitting the charity.
Fortunately, with companies like sweetriot, consumers don’t have to struggle with that decision. Founded on a commitment to create a multicultural world, Sarah Endline, built a company that spells consciousness in every tiny chocolate ‘peace’ candy that keeps cacao farmers employed and underdeveloped countries thriving.

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Cherrypicking Solar Stocks Could Be Rewarding

| Friday February 6th, 2009 | 1 Comment

samso.jpgAnalysts ganging up on solar stocks are worried about the insecurity of demand in the wake of cheaper conventional energy prices. Reduced government subsidies for the photovoltaic solar industry in Germany and Spain are also frequently cited as a reason to downgrade solar stocks. But it’s not all doom and gloom. There still are exceptional companies to be found.
Research house iSuppli recently put out a report estimating that worldwide turnover of solar PV panels will decline by 20% this year. Turnover of solar panel sales will dip from over $15 billion in 2008 to $13 billion in 2009 – marking the sector’s first ever contraction. The reason they say? Overproduction in 2008. Solar panel manufacturers produced 7.7 Gigawatts of solar capacity last year but only half of that production was actually connected.

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Growing a Green Business- with a Box

Tori Okner | Thursday February 5th, 2009 | 9 Comments

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As the industry icons of the old economic order crumble, TriplePundit offers you an inspiring example of a new, highly-promising business model. Through a conversation with the founder of Rentagreenbox.com, we look at how one young company is winning green awards and turning a profit.
Rentagreenbox bills itself as “the first, zero-waste pack and move solution in America.” The California based company converts post-consumer trash to an array of moving products and offers a sustainable solution for both residential and commercial moves. In brief, the company offers a moving assessment, delivers the rented moving supplies in trucks powered by biodiesel or vegetable oil, and then returns to pick up the boxes. The material comes from local landfills, a key supply source for their sustainable operation. The recopack [recycled ecological packing solution], a stackable plastic bin, is the cornerstone of their business.
A successful product designer before launching Rentagreenbox (formerly Earth Friendly Moving), founder Spencer Brown’s environmental awareness extended to beach cleanups and frequent trips to the farmers market. Today, he says simply, “I’ve evolved.”

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Mobile Service Locates Alternative Fueling Stations Nationwide

| Thursday February 5th, 2009 | 0 Comments

CNG_pump.jpg Finding a filling station for your alternative fuel vehicle just got a whole lot easier, thanks to a mobile information service developed by the US Dept. of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Lab, which manages the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center.
Building out a network of filling stations is a big part of the challenge when it comes to spurring demand for and use of alternative fuel vehicles. Whether it’s E85, biodiesel, compressed natural gas, electricity or hydrogen, there doesn’t seem to be near enough facilities around the nation to make alternative fuel vehicles convenient, certainly from a nationwide perspective.
Looking to make it easier for alternative fuel vehicle owners to locate what is out there the DoE yesterday announced the launch of the Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator, a project sponsored by the Clean Cities Initiative.
“Most drivers don’t realize alternative fuels are readily available in their areas, so the goal of the mobile station locator is to show them that alternative fueling sites are conveniently located,” stated Dennis Smith, director of the National Clean Cities program. “Mobile Internet access means consumers can find alternative fuel stations at their convenience, whenever and where ever they want.”
Making use of some of the latest mobile GPS-enabled location services, the mobile service uses Google Maps to produce maps to fueling sites and lists stations’ names, locations, contact information and business hours. Detailed driving directions and instant phone connections are accessible via this website.

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Energy Consumption and the Opportunities for the IT Industry

3p Contributor | Thursday February 5th, 2009 | 0 Comments

By Sudha Reddy


The IT industry contributes the same amount of emissions as the global air travel industry. It’s rumored that about 7 tons of CO2 are emitted per every million Google searches. Imagine the gigantic datacenters and servers that need to run all across the world to find answers to your queries. Given our current effects of climate change, technologies are probably harmful to the environment. But think about the world’s carbon footprint without the internet. “The Internet itself is carbon negative” says Subodh Bagat, Vice President, Energy Efficiency at Sun Microsystems, speaking at a recent “State of the Green Clean Industry” conference in Santa Clara. “Think of all the pages you need to print and all the miles you travel to share information and you can do online shopping too.” Without the Internet we’d be forced to emit much more carbon than we already do.
Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is one of the biggest areas of opportunity right now in reducing carbon emission. Datacenters are the first point of energy consumption in this industry. If datacenters can be more effectively harnessed by society, we can achieve huge energy savings. And unlike green consumer products, these can be made cost effective to the consumer. ICT’s can not only help in having a direct environmental impact but can also make people aware of the fact that things they do can have an indirect impact on the environment. Regulators should help force such efficiencies in this industry. Unlike Europe, the US regulations around ICT are focused on the wrong things. For example, a server is considered energy efficient if it uses less energy without comparison to how much work it does.

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2009 State of Green Business Forum: Progress, Caution, Hope

| Thursday February 5th, 2009 | 2 Comments

sogbfive.jpgThis Monday GreenBiz.com, led by one of the leading (and most entertaining) lights of green business, Joel Makower, held their first State of Green Business Forum. Built around the 2nd annual publication of their report of the same name, it served as a marker of progress, or in some cases lack of it, towards a more sustainable world, business and otherwise.
It was my first experience using Twitter as a reporting tool, sending out highlights of the day as I heard them, with those messages being “retweeted” (forwarded) by people on my network to people on theirs. Through the use of hash tags, people who wanted to follow the event were able to in a central place. Read our collective reporting here.

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Compostmodern: Fertile Ground for Creating a Sustainable Future

| Wednesday February 4th, 2009 | 0 Comments

Since 2004, Compostmodern has been a venue to create “fertile ground for sustainability.” A conference for sustainable design, Compostmodern is an interdisciplinary gathering of some of the best and brightest thinkers eager to explore new avenues in design and innovation to help create a society that responds positively to its social and environmental responsibilities.

Founded and sponsored by the San Francisco chapter of AIGA and the AIGA Center for Sustainable Design, Compostmodern is a conference that gives “fertile ground for sustainability,” providing a symposium for designers, manufacturers, and business leaders to meet, exchange ideas, and get inspired as they explore real-world opportunities for “transforming products, industries, and lives.”

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Shift Your Habit: A New Approach to Marketing the “Green Lifestyle”

| Wednesday February 4th, 2009 | 8 Comments

Shift%20Your%20Habit.pngThis isn’t a recent ad from Nissan, or the latest anti-smoking campaign from our friends Philip or Morris. Instead, it’s an up-and-coming attempt to simplify ecological living by putting the “friendly” back in “eco-friendly.” Shift Your Habit aims to affect behavior at an individual level, using approachable tips, tricks, and hints, as well as a stable of celebrity spokespeople to get the word out that you too can do something to live more consciously.

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Chipotle: Sustainable, Delicious, Profitable

| Wednesday February 4th, 2009 | 5 Comments

Chipotle.jpg Not only is Chipotle‘s food tasty and affordable, but the company is a leader in sustainability – from local, organic food purchasing to green building practices coupled with healthy sales and margins, Chipotle caught my eye. How do they do it? What is Chipotle doing that others in the food industry should learn from? I spoke with Chris Arnold, company spokesman, to find out.
I am always hearing of Chipotle’s advances in sustainability practices. But the first thing Arnold told me was, “We don’t have a sustainability initiative. All we do is ingrained in the way we run the business.” What? A leader without trying. Nine years ago a menu item wasn’t selling so well, so they switched to Niman Ranch naturally raised pork simply to help it sell better. Steve Ells, founder, CEO and head chef, visited some of Niman’s farms and loved what he saw; plus pigs raised well taste better. “When we switched to Niman we had to increase the price by $1, which changed carnitas from the cheapest to most expensive item on the menu at the time… our sales doubled,” Arnold told me. “We learned that people are willing to pay more for better food.”

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Stimulus Plan: Senate Version Adds Funding for Clean Coal

| Tuesday February 3rd, 2009 | 3 Comments

Clean%20Coal.jpgNow that the President’s stimulus bill has moved to the Senate, the clean energy debate is likely to take a different tack, raising the more fundamental issue of what constitutes “clean energy” and who gets to define it. The Senators from West Virginia, Robert Byrd and Jay Rockefeller, both Democrats, have been pushing to get as much funding as possible into the package for “clean coal” programs.
They have managed to tuck in $4.6 billion for coal-related projects to the Senate version of the bill, causing coal-related heartburn for many environmental advocates. The Senate funding is nearly double the $2.6 billion included in a current House version, and has received the blessing of the Senate Appropriations Committee.

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The State of Green Business is Objectively Mixed, Subjectively Hopeful

| Tuesday February 3rd, 2009 | 0 Comments

State%20of%20Green%20Business%20Forum.gifJoel Makower, co-founder and executive editor of Greener World Media, kicked off today’s State of Green Business Forum which coincided with a release of GreenBiz.com’s second annual State of Green Business report. Nearly 500 attendees filled the PG&E Auditorium in San Francisco, representing 20 states, Fortune 500 companies, NGO’s, government entities, consulting firms, the media and more. I was lucky enough to attend and cover the piece for the GreenBiz.com blog where you can see my in-depth coverage of the event. This piece contains excerpts from that coverage.
The State of Green Business report cites 10 trends in green business, and ranks 20 indicators ranked on a swim (green), tread (yellow), or sink (red) basis. Five indicators are “swimming” (cleantech investments, clean-energy patents, energy efficiency, paper use and recycling, and water intensity); twelve are “treading water”, neither here nor there (including green jobs, green office space, carbon transparency, corporate reporting and toxic emissions), and three are reported as “sinking” (carbon intensity, employee telecommuting, and e-waste). The objective results indicate a mixed bag – we clearly have lots of work to do.
But the five panels that followed told a more optimistic story. Not surprisingly, corporate leaders touted their employer’s efforts and avoided negative impacts, while non-profit and policy leaders gave more wary status reports. But all were hopeful that we can overcome the obstacles before us.

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MethodCleaning Combines A Light Approach With C2C Principles

| Tuesday February 3rd, 2009 | 0 Comments

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Method Products, the cradle to cradle cleaning company, is an intriguing example of how marketing and green are not mutually exclusive. This San Francisco company, which generated a breathtaking $75 million worth of turnover in 2007 has opened its doors in the UK and will soon expand further into Europe.
Its worth keeping an eye out on what its directors, Eric Ryan and Adam Lowry, are doing,
if only because the Obama-Biden team spotted them and invited Ryan to the inauguration ceremony.
The same guy – a former marketing guru – also struck a recent deal to provide Microsoft with a modern image. He acts himself in the computer giant’s latest tv commercial, an animation themed ‘Be Weird – Be Different’. Check out the ad on the company’s blog here.

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Newspapers On-Demand: Greener, Interactive Solution for Tough Times?

| Monday February 2nd, 2009 | 1 Comment

Times are particularly tough for newspaper publishers, distributors and agents. Even august members of the industry, such as the New York Times and Washington Post, are feeling the pain and being forced to take some extraordinary measures to assure their sustainability while trying to adapt to a radically different news market and technological environment.
The emergence of commercial quality, on-demand digital distribution and publishing systems may afford participants all along the supply chain a “greener” way forward, though pulp & paper suppliers and truckers may be the worse off for it.

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