What can you learn as a Kinship Fellow?

Interested in accelerating conservation outcomes in your work? The Kinship Fellows program is accepting applications for its 2017 program.

For over 15 years, the Kinship Conservation Fellows program has been helping conservationists advance their use of market-based tools. Each year, the program hosts 18 Fellows for a month-long, in-residence program in Bellingham, Washington. Using real world examples, Fellows design and evaluate market-based approaches to conservation challenges, and depart with solutions that they can apply to their own work.

2015 Fellow, Emy Brawley came to the program with a concept for a farmland conservation investment fund. Her project will soon be developed into a pilot. Read Emy’s story.

Jen Chapman is developing markets for the invasive lionfish in Belize. When she came to the Fellows program in 2014, she was looking for a way to enhance her natural science background to address the real challenges in her work. Read Jen’s story.

When Adam Klauber came to the program in 2011, he was working for the U.S. Department of Transportation and had the idea to leverage FAA aircraft flight path data to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Read Adam’s story.

Interested in accelerating conservation outcomes in your work? The Kinship Fellows program is accepting applications for its 2017 program, which will be held at Western Washington University in Bellingham, Washington, from June 25-July 26, 2017. Fellows receive a $6,000 stipend and housing for the month. Applications are only accepted online and must be submitted by January 16, 2017.

About the Kinship Conservation Fellows Program

Established in 2001, Kinship Conservation Fellows is developing a community of leaders dedicated to collaborative approaches to environmental issues with an emphasis on market-based principles.

www.kinshipfellows.org

 

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