Human Values and Corporate Impact

The case of JPMorgan Chase

The Supreme Court’s 2010 “Citizens United” decision affirms the legality of treating corporations as persons — having a right to free speech, manifested in money contributions in elections. But, corporations should not be treated as people, because they do not act like people, argues Donald J. Munro of the University of Michigan. In this six-part series, Munro focuses on how certain human moral values and some corporate behaviors are incompatible, using JPMorgan Chase as an example.

Human Values and Corporate Social Impact: Learning and Foresight

Foresight may also involve predictions of how the law or fellow citizens will respond to our choices, as in the expectation of rewards…

Human Values and Social Impact: Can Trust Exist Without Accountability?

Donald J. Munro of the University of Michigan asks: Can there be a trust relationship when the purchaser of a home loan does…

Human Values and Corporate Social Impact: Fairness in Pay Ratios

Culture determines the varying boundaries of what constitutes “equal shares.” And who is “equal” in status. In our own society, popular opinion may…

Human Values and Corporate Social Impact: Respect and Shame

Shame involves an attack on one’s inner worth. It is one of those traits that reveals self-reflection, of which humans alone seem to…

Human Values and CSR: Love, Compassion, Empathy and Altruism

Bonding with friends and others has some roots in our family love; those bonds result in our having empathy for both family and…

Human Values and Corporate Social Impact: The Case of JPMorgan Chase

The Supreme Court’s 2010 “Citizens United” decision affirms the legality of treating corporations as persons -- having a right to free speech, manifested…