Jan Lee

Jan Lee is a former news editor and award-winning editorial writer whose non-fiction and fiction have been published in the U.S., Canada, Mexico, the U.K. and Australia. Her articles and posts can be found on TriplePundit, JustMeans, and her blog, The Multicultural Jew, as well as other publications. She currently splits her residence between the city of Vancouver, British Columbia and the rural farmlands of Idaho.

SPECIAL SERIES: COMMIT! Forum

Ben & Jerry’s: Why Brands Taking Stands is Smart Business

Few brands are as famous for their social activism than Ben & Jerry’s. The Vermont ice cream maker with global revenues of more than $1.2 billion (2015) is as much known for its social conscience as for its creamy, irresistible ice cream flavors. Pick a flavor and chances are you’ll walk away with more than just a good feeling in your tummy: You’ll feel you’re making a statement.

Arkema Chemical Plant Explosion Shows Downsides to EPA Cuts

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has been having a tough time promoting his plans to cut EPA regulations. First an appeals court squashed his plans to delay enforcement of the Methane Rule. Then there was Hurricane Harvey and the collapse of the Arkema plant. Now he has a list of complex questions to answer for homework about just how his agency plans to protect Americans from environmental disasters.

Mexico Tells Trump It Won’t Pay for Wall, Will Help Harvey Victims

This weekend, as Texas towns were being pummeled by Hurricane Harvey, President Trump sent out another deriding tweet about Mexico with assurance that the neighbors down south would pay for a wall. The answer he got back may not be what he expected, but it has reaffirmed that when it comes to natural disasters and suffering populations, neighbors can be counted on to help.

Trump Reversal of Flood Risk Standards Will Hurt Communities Like Houston

Trump insists that rescinding the Obama-era Flood Risk Standards will speed up construction and save communities money. But experts familiar with the aftermath of Hurricanes Katrina, Sandy and Ike say that nixing standards that require climate change to be considered in how cities are built (or rebuilt) will set communities up for a world of hurt.

Concrete Jungle Exacerbates Houston Flooding

Hurricane Harvey and climate change are being blamed for Houston’s unprecedented flooding this weekend. But experts point out that the volume of rain — 12 trillion gallons — that deluged the city wasn’t really the problem. It was the lack of planning for predictable increased flooding.

Trump’s DOE Invests $13M in Alternative Fuel Vehicles

New electric vehicles that can support mass transit are on the horizon, according to an announcement by the Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Office. The office has just dolled out $13.4 million to encourage the production of alternative fuel vehicles that can support community mass transit.

GMO Crop Yields Uncertain in Warming Climates According to New Research

The world’s population is expected to increase to just under 10 billion by 2050. Food production must be smart, efficient and sustainable say scientists, and new research suggest it’s agroecology, not genetic engineering, that has the best tools at hand for providing enough food for hungry populations.

The Industrious Bee: Replacing Plastic Products with Beeswax

Some industrious have found a way to replace plastic wrap, that everyday item we use to preserve our leftovers, lunches and favorite foods. And to do so, they’re using the lessons of the past to solve modern-day challenges.

The Impact of the Solar Eclipse on the Utility Grid

The total solar eclipse on Aug. 21 is expected to be a “first” in many ways. For many businesses within the 60-70-mile width of the eclipse’s path, it will be a money-maker. But for power grid operators that depend on solar power now, the eclipse presents new and rarely faced challenges.

Scientists Call for Trump to Accept Climate Report

The recent publication of a climate report draft by the New York Times is raising questions about how President Donald Trump will tight walk the precarious balance between appeasing his voter base (that largely doesn’t believe human-made global warming exists) and a report that is blunt about the fact that human activities have a large role to play in its existence and impact. Recent efforts by federal agencies to evade talking about the phenomena suggests Trump still has a way to go to realize the implications of denouncing climate change. And that has scientists worried.